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Do You Need to Baby-Proof Your Wedding Venue?

Make sure your littlest guests are safe on your big day.

Contributing Writer
kseniya sadhir wedding italy baby on lap
Photography by: Slava Mishura

There are few things more adorable than little ones participating in your big day. But does inviting the kiddie-table set to your wedding mean extra prep for you? We asked pros from around the industry to get their take on how much childcare and baby-proofing should be a concern for brides and grooms on their wedding days.

 

"Baby-proofing the venue isn't something we've come across," says Megan Southerland of the Green Building in Brooklyn. But she adds that there are other considerations couples have taken in order to make the day more manageable for parents and caretakers. "Clients in the past have chosen to hire a babysitter to watch their guests' children in our venues private suite, or even in a hotel room a block away from the venue," she says. "This is helpful for those parents looking to enjoy themselves the night of."

 

Related: The Etiquette of Having Children at Your Wedding

 

However, if hiring an extra eye for little ones isn't enough to put your mind at ease, Alix Partow, president of Partow Events, points out a few specific areas to watch out for. When it comes to floral arrangements and other décor, she tells couples to be sure that candles are out of reach of little hands—no explanation necessary here. Once you're fire-proofed, do as Partow does and view the venue through the eyes of a child. "Be sure to look for potential hazards at your wedding venue, such as water features including fountains, pools, or even the ocean," she says. "Kids are curious and quick to disappear." Once you've identified potential problem areas, you can speak with the venue about stationing some extra security in these spots.

 

If you can't bare the thought of adding one more thing to your to-do list (or you realize your venue is far from child-friendly no matter what you do) don't sweat it, says planner Janie Haas. "I think that brides and grooms have enough to worry about, so if a parent is bringing a small child, we normally say that it is that parent's responsibility to watch their child," the pro explains.