New This Month

How to Cope with Allergies on Your Wedding Day

You want your eyes to be clouded by tears of joy—not because of your allergies.

Contributing Writer
floral and woodland themed ceremony aisle decor
Photography by: Ryan Flynn Photography

Thanks to record pollen levels this year, your outdoor wedding, may have an unwanted guest: allergens. Pollen from flowers, trees, and other environmental sources can cause irritations that can range in severity from watery eyes to uncontrollable sneezing. Who wants to worry about all of that on their wedding day? Fortunately, you might not have to. With a little advanced planning, some medication, and a few tactical trips, there are things you can do to keep from saying "achoo" instead of "I do."

 

Related: So You're Sick on Your Wedding Day—Now What?

 

See Your Doctor

Board certified physician Dr. Lakiea Wright says if you are worried about allergies getting in the way of your big day, your first step should be to talk your healthcare provider and to get tested for seasonal allergies. "Every spring millions of people seek out allergy relief through over-the-counter drugs without really knowing their diagnosis," she says. Allergy testing will help you identify exactly which allergens are affecting you; in turn, your doctor will be able to help you come up with an effective treatment plan.

 

Control What You Can

Dr. Wright suggests remaining indoors as much as possible on the wedding day, keeping windows closed both inside your venue and in the car. Additionally, she suggests having your getting-ready space cleaned just before you'll be entering—it's the best way to ensure the room is dust-free. Be sure to ask to have the room dusted with a damp rag instead of dry dusting, as a damp rag can prevent the dust and dust mites from flying into the air, thus making your allergies even worse.

 

Take the Right Medication

If you need additional help, such as medication, Dr. Wright says to talk to your healthcare provider before starting any over the counter (OTC) products. A non-drowsy, long acting antihistamine taken at least one hour prior to the start of your wedding should be enough for a mild case of allergies. "These will have minimal interactions with other substances," Dr. Wright adds, meaning you can safely take an allergy pill and still enjoy a few glasses of Champagne. "For nasal symptoms, taking an over the counter daily nasal steroids may help." Dr. Wright also suggests using a saline rinse to remove any allergens that may already be present. As for those watery, itchy eyes, you can try using OTC allergy eye drops. Just remember to double check the recommendations for contact wearers as they may be different than for non-wearers.

 

Keep Your Eye Makeup Where It Belongs

Amber Anderson, a business coach with Refine for Wedding Planners, says you should let your makeup artist know about your allergies as they may use different products to ensure runny, itchy eyes won't cause your makeup to smear. "Carrying tissues and blotting can be helpful, and it's also a good idea to have sample makeup left by your stylist for any touch ups you might need later in the evening." Another tip: Skip the false eyelashes if itchy, watery eyes are a concern.