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How to Let Your Vendors and Guests Know Who Your Wedding Point Person Is

Because the last thing we need is your caterer calling you on the morning of the big day.

Contributing Writer
wedding planner putting finishing touches on a reception table
Photography by: Twah Dougherty

Because there are so many moving parts associated with the wedding day, it's important that the bride and groom select someone they trust—a wedding planner or coordinator, a parent, or a member of the bridal party—to serve as a point person for vendors and guests who have last-minute questions. Since the couple will be busy in the hours leading up to the wedding, it's crucial that their big-day pros and those attending the celebration know who to contact should anything come up. Here, wedding planner Karina Crockett of Magnolia Affairs shares her best advice on how to let all of the parties involved in your wedding know who their point person is.

 

Related: Ways You Can Help Your Vendors Do an Amazing Job with Your Wedding

 

Share the information ahead of time.

"As a wedding planner, I always tell my couples know to give out my information to anyone who may need something the weekend of the wedding," says Crockett. Whether it's the day before, of, or after the wedding, you won't want to be bothered by any questions or issues that may arise. You should give your vendors your point person's contact information, and you may want to post it on your wedding website for anyone else who may need it.

 

Introduce your point person to your VIPs.

If you're having a rehearsal dinner, it's a good idea to introduce your VIPs to the point person, assuming they don't already know him or her. "Usually, if a question comes up during the wedding day one of those people will be nearby and will know who I am and how to get in contact with me," says Crockett. "It also give the couple's friends and family a chance to ask any questions they may have prior to the big day."

 

Ask them to dress the part.

It's easy to tell who the point person is if he or she stands out from the rest of the crowd. Most wedding planners and day-of coordinators will be in all-black attire, but if a parent or family member is serving as your point person, you may want to ask them to hold off on changing into their formal wear until closer to the ceremony start time. If they're running around handling last-minute tasks, you don't want to risk their wedding attire getting wrinkled.