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Jimmy Fallon's Proposal to Wife Nancy Didn't Go Quite as Planned

But there was still a happy ending.

nancy juvonen and jimmy fallon
Photography by: Todd Williamson/Getty Images

When Jimmy Fallon was ready to ask his now-wife Nancy Juvonen to marry him, he wanted to do so in the perfect way. Unfortunately, she put a kink in his initial plans, and when he tried again, her initial reaction wasn't what he expected. 

 

People reports that the Tonight Show host had planned to propose when Juvonen (a Hollywood producer who worked on his 2005 movie Fever Pitch) visited him in New York City. But she threw him a curveball when she scored a reservation at the exclusive restaurant Per Se. It was a romantic setting, but Fallon decided against popping the question there. "I didn't want to propose in Per Se because what if one year it moves locations and years later I'm going to have kids and go, 'Your mom and I got [engaged here]. I know it's a laser tag place but at one point it was a very fancy restaurant,'" he explains.

 

RELATED: 16 Celebrity Proposal Stories You've Got to Hear

 

The couple enjoyed an elaborate, multi-course meal, and Fallon postponed his proposal another three months—when he and Juvonen were at her parents' summer home on New Hampshire's Lake Winnipesaukee. It was another picturesque spot for what should have been a special moment, but Fallon was already nervous about what would happen. "I went out to the dock and said [to myself], 'Don't cry. Let her cry first,'" he says. "I'm a pretty mushy guy… and I just wanted it to be perfect," he says. 

 

He got down on one knee and, despite his best efforts to keep it together, bawled immediately. That's when Juvonen asked if he was having a stroke. "My face was like I was smelling burnt toast," he recalls. When it was clear that he was just overwhelmed by emotion, she said "yes" and they married in December 2007. Now, more than a decade later, they have two daughters, Winnie Rose and Frances Cole, and they can return as a family to the spot where the marriage all began—which will never be turned into a laser tag place.