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Who Should You Choose as Your Wedding Ceremony Readers?

If you're having a tough time picking, think of the important people in your life who aren't in the bridal party.

Contributing Writer
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Photography by: Charlotte Jenks Lewis

You asked your sister, cousin, and best friend to be bridesmaids, but what roles can other key people in your life—like your good friend from work or your groom's college buddy—play in your wedding? As it turns out, they may be perfectly suited to be ceremony readers. Here are some possibilities for the important job.

 

Related: Wedding Ceremony Readings to Consider for Your I Do’s

 

Your preteen brother.

At 12, he's too old to be a ring bearer and but too young to be a groomsman. As long as the boy can speak in front of a crowd, this would be a loving choice. Be sure to go over any hard-to-pronounce words with him beforehand.

 

A grandparent.

If you're close to any of your grandparents and want to honor them in a special way—besides giving them a corsage or boutonnière on the wedding day—ask them to be readers. They'll be thrilled! Assign a groomsman to help them up to the podium, if necessary.

 

Your mom and his.

Many couples honor their moms by asking them to do readings. It's a way of putting both of these ladies in the spotlight and acknowledging their impact on your lives.

 

A sibling who's not in the wedding party.

There are lots of reasons why a sibling isn't a bridesmaid or groomsman, such as they live out of town and couldn't take on any bridal party responsibilities or else you weren't having attendants at all, and having a wedding-day-only task suits them better. Or though you two love each other, you frankly aren't that close, but you still want them to have a role in your wedding. Asking them to perform a reading is a nice way to include him or her in the celebration.

 

A godparent.

Whether it's an aunt or uncle, or family friend, you want to acknowledge the importance of this person in your life since babyhood.

 

A longtime friend

You've known each other since forever and, though you still feel close, you mostly communicate by text these days. Asking her to do a reading shows she's still deserving of a place in your wedding plans. Your future husband's former college roommate, who he only sees from time to time but still feels a bond with, is a good choice, too.