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What Should You Do If You and Your Fiancé Can't Agree on a Honeymoon Destination?

With our tips, you'll be booking airfare in no time.

Contributing Writer
couple lounging on beach
Photography by: Tim McKenna

You're dreaming of a tropical honeymoon in paradise, but your fiancé has his sights set on trekking Machu Picchu. When the whole world's on the table, it's not really that surprising that two people might have vastly different ideas about what a dream honeymoon would look like. So what happens when you and your future husband or wife just can't agree on where to go after the wedding? Here are a few ideas to get your newlywed vacation planning back on track.

 

Related: How to Start Planning Your Honeymoon

 

Narrow your choices.

First things first: Start by taking the whole world off the table by agreeing at least on a continent or broader region of the world that appeals to you both. There's no use debating the merits of a honeymoon in Thailand versus a post-nuptial trip in Peru; it's like comparing apples to oranges. If that doesn't work, try to think more broadly about the type of honeymoon you're interested in. Are you hoping for rest and relaxation by a beautiful beach? Is it culture and gastronomy in a world-famous city? A bucket-list adventure? Decide what matters most to you both, then go from there.

 

Get creative with your itinerary.

There's no reason why you can't plan a honeymoon that appeals to you both. With some creative planning, you can come up with an itinerary that checks all the boxes: How about spending a few days exploring Bangkok before shipping off to the islands in the south of Thailand, or pairing a rustic, safari adventure in the Serengeti with a few days at a beach resort in Zanzibar? If you have a couple of long flights to get to your chosen locale, planning a few days' stopover in the city you're transferring through is another way to add a little something extra to your trip. Amsterdam, Mexico City, Reykjavik, Singapore, and Dubai are all good choices.

 

Go to Plan B

If you're still having trouble finding common ground, what are some other options that you could both get behind? Being open-minded and willing to explore possibilities is good practice for life as a married couple. And while there are a lot of expectations about honeymoons, at the end of the day, it's just a vacation. You have your whole lives together to get to some of those other bucket-list destinations out there, so don't worry about that.