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Planning a Same-Sex Couple's Wedding Shower? Here's What You Need to Know

Two brides or two grooms, one awesome party.

Contributing Writer
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Photography by: Ben Christensen Photography

Your dearest friends are tying the knot, and you're so excited to throw them a wedding shower. But are the shower rules the same for a same-sex couple as they are for a straight pairing? While some may need a tweak here and there (do you make both partners wear the dreaded/not dreaded ribbon hat?), the premise is identical: Invite people, feed them, open gifts. Here are a few pointers to keep in mind if you're planning a wedding shower for a same-sex couple.

 

Related: Should Same-Sex Couples Share a Wedding Shower?

 

Make sure the couple wants a shower.

There's no point in throwing a party for a couple who would prefer otherwise. If only one partner is interested in a party, then by all means plan a celebration tailored to his or her unique tastes. There's no rule that says the party needs to be for both brides or both grooms.

 

The planner is in the wedding party.

Just like with any wedding, the person who heads to the party store for supplies is the maid (or maids) of honor; in the case of a two-groom wedding, the job would go to the best man (or best men). If there's no wedding party, then siblings or close friends of the couple should get their planner hats on.

 

Don't limit the guest list.

Just because two guys or two girls are getting married, you don't have to limit the guests to only female or only male. Make the party gender-inclusive and invite all those close to the brides or grooms.

 

Plan a menu and entertainment.

Make it a brunch, lunch, cocktail party—the door is open to any type of get-together you want, in a restaurant or someone's home. Besides watching the couple open gifts—which can be a yawner after a while, if there's a big pile—plan ridiculous but fun games, like the classic one where guests compete in toilet-paper dressmaking. 

 

Send out invites at least six weeks ahead of the wedding.

After you settle on a date, time, and place (with the couple's input, unless you're making it a surprise), send out invitations; include registry information, if that's available. Mailed invites are a nice touch but if you think online ones would work better, find an invite that's suitable and hit send!