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What Should the Groomsmen Expect to Pay For?

Even for the guys, being in a wedding party often comes with a hefty price tag.

Contributing Writer
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Photography by: Adam Barnes

Between paying for everything from the pre-wedding parties to wedding-day clothing, being a member of a pal's bridal party can be costly. And it's not just bridesmaids who shell out the big bucks—groomsmen also are expected to pay up. But just how much that is in dollar amounts depends on a few factors, like the formality of the wedding, where you live in relation to the wedding venue, and how elaborate the bachelor party is. Here's what a groomsman can expect to pay for.

 

Related: How to Make Sure Your Groomsmen Order Their Suits or Tuxes on Time

 

The Tuxedo Rental

If the wedding is formal, you'll probably be renting a tux. That will cost an average of $135, according to Savvi Formalwear, a national network of independent wedding formalwear specialists. If you go the designer route, it's closer to $200. You'll have to shell out more money if accessories like shoes and cufflinks are not included in the price. If you're lucky enough to own your own tux or if the dress code is more casual, and an outfit you already have in your closet fits the bill, your cost to dress up for the wedding is an enviable zero.

 

The Bachelor Party

This men-only mainstay could be as simple (meaning, affordable) as a couple of six-packs and video games at the best man's house one night or as elaborate (meaning, expensive) as a four-day weekend in Cabo. Not interested in either option? There's also the ever-popular night out in town. Prices vary widely, so expected to pay anywhere from a few bucks to hundreds. Whatever you do, make sure the majority of groomsmen is onboard with the plan before inviting others.

 

The Wedding Gift

The final expense is the wedding gift, and you can either pick something off the couple's registry or give cash. And no, you don't have a year to hand it over—that's a weird wedding fallacy that's been kicking around for decades. Give them your gift before the wedding or after the honeymoon.