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How to Delegate Wedding-Planning Tasks When You're a Self-Proclaimed Control Freak

Learn to let go before you drive yourself crazy.

Contributing Writer
couple planning at table

If you're like most brides-to-be, you're quickly learning that giving up control of wedding-related tasks (even those that relate to details you didn't think you'd care about!) is hard. Whether you're Type A by nature or just hyper-focused on making your wedding the best day of your life, it can be tough to trust anyone else with your meticulously controlled and calculated plan. But as you look at your ever-growing list of to-dos and those seemingly endless budget spreadsheets, you're probably also realizing that planning a wedding is no easy feat, with or without a wedding planner, and inevitably, you're going to need help. If you're not a natural at delegating, we're offering some tips that will get you the help you need without feeling like you're losing control.

 

Related: Wedding Planning vs. Reality

 

Decide what's most important to you.

This is true of wedding planning in general, but especially so when you're looking to hand off some planning responsibilities. First and foremost, you and your fiancé should come up with a list of three to five priorities that you absolutely can't imagine letting anyone else handle. If choosing the wedding flowers is something that ranks highly with you, don't delegate it. Similarly, if you know you don't care too much about stationery, let your mom, mother-in-law, or sister scour the internet, then provide you with a short list based on photos and reviews.

 

Think about your group's strengths.

Once you figure out which elements you feel comfortable delegating, think about your family and bridal party's strengths. For example, if your sister is a beauty junkie ask her take the lead researching makeup artists and hairstylists. Share an idea of what you're looking for, then let her come back with a few recommendations she think would work best before you meet with each. The key is to ensure you're not completely shut out of the process, but that you let your friends and family use their talents to help get you through the legwork.

 

Consult a pro.

If you've been on the fence about hiring a wedding planner, now might be the time to seriously consider it. Your pro will help you focus on the big-picture details, then handle the nitty-gritty on their own. If receiving a short list of vendors in each category, having someone else handle the contracts, and manage the schedule sounds like a huge relief, a wedding planner would be well worth the expense.

 

Remember to ask for help.

Your friends and family can't help you if they don't know that you're feeling overwhelmed. The most important rule of delegation is to let those around you know exactly what you need, so don't be afraid to call up your loved ones and see if they can lend a hand.