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Tying the Knot Over the Winter? Here's How You Prepare for a Major Snow Storm on Your Big Day

You always want to have a plan.

Contributing Writer
couple in snow
Photography by: Shuttergram Portraits

If you're getting married on a winter day in a cold climate, you know there's a chance it'll snow. But instead of just hoping for mild weather or panicking in the event the white stuff does fall, have an inclement weather plan figured out ahead of time. While flurries are one thing, a major snowstorm could mean disaster if you haven't thought through every scenario. Here, our best tips for preparing for any amount of snow on your big day—that way, whether it flurries or blizzards, you'll sing a confident, "Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow," knowing everything will run smoothly.

 

Winter Wedding Emergencies—Solved

 

Discuss a plan with vendors.

A major snowfall on your wedding day could upset even the most carefully planned celebration. Discuss what would happen in the event of inclement weather with each vendor, including what they do in the case of a serious blizzard. Do they have a plan in place to deliver your flowers, or would you have to pick them up? Is there a certain amount of snow that would warrant your venue closing down entirely? While these are worst-case scenarios, arm yourself with information from the very beginning, that way nothing comes as a surprise.

 

Make sure all pathways will be shoveled and roadways cleared.

The last thing you want is for someone to fall on a slippery sidewalk. Check in with the ceremony and reception venues and ask about snow removal—you might have to alert guests to certain entrances that will definitely be cleared. 

 

Have several all-wheel-drive cars ready for you, the groom, and the bridal party.

Your friends' SUVs might not have the elegance of a limo but they'll do the job of getting you safely to and from the ceremony and reception.

 

Hire a shuttle to take guests from their hotel to the wedding venues.

If your guests are all staying in the same hotel, hire a shuttle service that can handle the snow. This should be a cinch to arrange and will be hugely appreciated by out-of-towners who may not be used to driving on snow- and ice-covered roadways. 

 

Bring snow boots and a fake fur with you for outdoor shots.

Instead of being upset that it's snowing, use the full-of-flakes landscape as a backdrop. Falling snow has a magical effect on photos, so talk to your photographer about taking advantage of it for some fun shots.

 

Have a contingency indoor location in lieu of a tent.

If snow is really coming down, a tent can't be counted on for your reception; you'll need to move the party indoors for the comfort and safety of your loved ones. Although it may seem like a waste of time and money, setting up a "just in case" room is worth it. You won't be scrambling at the last minute to turn a bare room into a party place. It'll save yourself from a lot of stress.