Would they be happier with something intimate, or is it their dream to be surrounded by a crowd during this important moment?

By Sara Dickinson
November 20, 2019

Trying to come up with an unforgettable way to propose? Should you hire a proposal planner to pull off an intricate scavenger hunt or pop the question over dinner at home? It can be hard to know what kind of proposal your partner would want—after all, this is bound to become a memory that will last a lifetime, so you want to get it just right. Michele Velazquez, professional proposal planner and co-owner of The Heart Bandits, suggests considering three things before finalizing your proposal plans.

Related: The Pros and Cons of a Public Proposal

Are They an Introvert or Extrovert?

According to Velazquez, the very first thing to think about when you're coming up with your proposal plan is whether your partner is introverted or extroverted. "This is very important because if your partner is an extrovert, they will likely be pleased with a proposal that makes them the center of attention," Velazquez explains. But if your partner is more of a private person, they'll likely appreciate a proposal that feels more intimate. Consider getting down on one knee during a walk through the park or at home over dinner. Even though they'll be excited to share the news with friends and family, an introvert will probably enjoy a moment to soak it all in before getting all the attention.

What Are They Passionate About?

Velazquez recommends thinking about what your partner likes to do on a regular basis. "Maybe they love shopping, the theater, or the beach. Once you brainstorm the things your partner loves, you can start to consider if that could be the setting for the proposal," she says. Planning the proposal around experiences that are typical to your partner's day-to-day life will make it more of a surprise, too. Even if your partner has a feeling a proposal is coming, they probably won't expect you to get down on one knee at the mall or to find a love poem or scavenger hunt in the day's mail.

What's Your Love Story?

"The final element is to think about all of the things that are important to your particular love story," Velazquez says. Whether you incorporate the way you met, your favorite vacation spot together, or something else that feels defining to your relationship, this is a great way to make your proposal feel romantic and special. Consider recreating your first date, playing your favorite love song, or involving a pet you two have together to make your proposal a reflection of your unique love story.

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