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This Is How You Handle Wedding Crashers

It doesn't just happen in the movies.

Contributing Writer
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Photography by: New Line/Courtesy Neal Peters Collection

Image this: You're at your wedding reception, busy chatting with your guests, when you spot someone who you didn't invite—a stranger, a friend you had a falling out with, a plus-one. None of these people should be there. What do you do? First, don't panic. Second, get help. Here's what to do in three different wedding-crasher scenarios.

 

Wedding Etiquette Mistakes Not to Make

 

The Crasher: A Stranger

A stranger, maybe a tipsy guest at the resort where you're holding the wedding, might wander into your party looking for free food and booze. Or it'll be a teenager who thinks posting a video on Snapchat of themselves crashing a wedding will be hilarious. Alerting resort personnel, such as the banquet manager or maître d', to quietly walk the unwelcomed guests out should put a quick end to their shenanigans.

 

The Crasher: An Enemy

If the crasher is someone who you know but don't get along with, like an estranged family member or an ex, don't interact with them. Instead, walk away before tempers flare. Getting involved in a potential brawl isn't how you envisioned your wedding day. Ask someone who is calm and can defuse the situation—your wedding planner, a bridesmaid, your dad—to deal with the crasher and ask them to leave.

 

The Crasher: A Plus-One

If an invited guest brings a surprise plus-one (a date, their child), it would be more awkward to ask them to leave than to let them stay. Have a bridesmaid or your mom immediately alert the caterer to prepare an additional meal (a well-established caterer will always have extra food). If it's a seated meal, the wait staff should be told to squeeze in an extra place setting at the guest's table.

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About the Author

Nancy Mattia

Though Nancy has been writing about weddings for years, she admits that watching a bride walk down the aisle—even on TV—still makes her tear up. The New York-area writer's other favorite wedding moments are when the groom sees the bride for the first time, hearing the toasts, and when she sees a waiter with a tray full of hors d'oeuvres walking towards her. 

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