New This Month

Stitch Your Way to Modern Elegance with This DIY Wedding Vase

Create your own bookbinding-inspired vase cover.

david stark design bookbinding vase
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

Something old that somehow looks so fresh and new, Japanese bookbinding is constantly being modernized. We interpreted the incredible art in a way that's sure to set off your centerpiece in style. Japanese bookbinding, also called stab binding, was first used over 2,000 years ago and is still practiced in many countries. Our homage to this traditional technique is cleverly crafted using a vase, which creates a truly unexpected combination of fabric, stitching, and flowers. Typically waxed thread is used for bookbinding, but we've used easy-to-find embroidery thread. We also used an off-white shade of Ultrasuede, but you can try this technique with any color that suits your décor and with other heavy fabrics, such as leather.

 

Show off your stitched vase cover as a wow-worthy entry moment for your reception, to decorate the guest book table, or anywhere else a uniquely handmade touch is needed. Plus, this old-meets-new décor idea works for so many more occasions than the wedding reception itself. This vase also looks spectacular as décor for a bridal shower, rehearsal dinner or post-wedding brunch. The gorgeous, subtle stitching adds instant interest and plenty of personality, which is something any event can benefit from. Then, after your blooms have long faded, you'll be left with a beautiful keepsake to cherish for years to come. Here, learn how to create your own.

 

David Stark Designs the Ultimate Summer Wedding Bouquet

david stark design bookbinding vase supplies
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

The Tools

  • Thick Ultrasuede of your choice (we used off white purchased from NY Elegant Fabrics)
  • Scissors
  • Quilting ruler and soft measuring tape
  • Straight-sided vase (we used a 6" x 4")
  • Embroidery thread color of your choice
  • Needle and awl
  • Pencil
  • Scrap paper
  • PDF guide
david stark design bookbinding vase step one
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

How-to

1. Use your soft measuring tape to measure the circumference and height of the vase. Next, create a pattern with your scrap paper that is exactly the height of the vase and 1.5" longer than the circumference.

david stark design bookbinding vase step two
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

2. Using your newly made pattern carefully cut out a matching piece of your fabric.

david stark design bookbinding vase step three
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

3. Check the fit of your fabric over the vase. When the edges align together you should have 3/4" of extra space coming from each end of the fabric. Make a small mark where the vase will fit snug.

david stark design bookbinding vase step four
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

4. Removing the fabric from the vase, perfectly line up the ends and edges before preparing to mark your stitching points. To do this, add three equally spaced dots 3/4" in from the end. Below that add four equally spaced dots.

david stark design bookbinding vase step five
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

5. Thread your needle with approximately two yards of embroidery thread. Follow the guide to help you successfully stitch the fabric. Starting from in-between the fabric panels go through the center dot (move #1). As you pull your thread through, leave a tail end of 5" to use later.

david stark design bookbinding vase step six
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

6. Continue to follow the guide. Go over the bottom edge for move #2, up from the bottom and through the center hole for move #3, and so on. We found it easier to keep track of where we were on the guide by marking with a pencil after we completed each step.

david stark design bookbinding vase step seven
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

7. You should follow the guide until you get to move #40, which will be the tail end of your string. This end of the string will need to end between the layers of fabric just like the first piece did. Tie the two ends together, trimming any excess. Hide the knot by tucking it under and away.

david stark design bookbinding vase step eight
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production

8. Working from the bottom, slip your new vase sleeve over the glass cylinder. It should be a snug fit. You can adjust and straighten out your bookbinding stitches once the sleeve is applied. You can make your vase covers in uniform sizes or try using cylinder vases of different heights and widths.

david stark design bookbinding vase final
Photography by: David Stark Design & Production
Advertisement
Advertisement

Don't Miss…