New This Month

This Is What Guests Hate Most About Weddings

Surprise, surprise, it's not the boring chicken dinner.

Contributing Writer
real-wedding-summer-bryanjenhuangsb400h-533-ds111116.jpg
Photography by: Jen Huang

You've put a lot of time and effort into planning a wedding day that friends and family will enjoy: You have flip flops for all the dancing ladies, you're serving a diverse menu to appeal to many different tastes. So you'd be shocked if guests complained about any part of your day, right? To be on the safe side, check out these seven things that drive wedding guests crazy and make sure you didn't overlook anything. 

 

Your Wedding Guest Etiquette Questions Answered

 

When there's more than an hour between the ceremony and reception.

There's nothing worse than being all dressed up and far from home with two hours (or more!) to kill between the "I do's" and the party. Try your hardest to move back the ceremony or move up the reception so that the time difference is an hour or less. If it's not possible, ask a relative or friend in the area to host an informal get-together where out-of-towners can hang out for the duration of the gap. It doesn't have to be anything super fancy, even iced tea and cookies will do!

 

Bad directions.

With GPS on cell phones, finding your way from Point A (the ceremony) to Point B (the reception) is much easier than it used to be. But if you're going to provide directions, make sure all the details, especially street names, are correct. Before printing them, ask someone not familiar with the area to test them out and tweak as needed.

 

Cash bars.

If you're inviting your loved ones to celebrate your wedding, you should pay for their drinks. Sure, alcohol is expensive, but asking your guests to pick up the tab is tacky. (You'd never charge them for dinner, right?) If you can't afford a full bar, it's perfectly fine to have a limited selection, such as wine, beer, and a signature cocktail. As long as it's free, guests will drink whatever is available to them.

 

Long toasts.

If you don't plan who will speak at the reception, and instead open up the floor to "whoever wants to say a few words," those "few words" could end up being a guest's rambling monologue. A person's attention span lasts about three minutes before their mind zones out and they start thinking about dessert or the next episode of Mr. Robot.

 

Weddings during a three-day weekend.

Want to crush someone's long-awaited Memorial Day, July 4, or Labor Day weekend vacation plans? Get married during one of those holidays. On the other hand, if your wedding is happening in a tropical locale or fun urban area, some guests might actually welcome the chance to get away.

 

Receiving lines.

Most of the time they're too long and a time suck since they get in the way of starting the reception. If you decide to skip this tradition, be sure to table-hop at the reception instead to thank guests for coming.

 

No plus-one.

If your budget or space is tight, there's little you can do to appease the single crowd who want to bring dates. But if someone is in a long-term relationship, the partner should get an invitation. And make this exception: The friend who won't know another soul and will sit alone while her tablemates are all shaking their thing on the dance floor.

Advertisement
About the Author

Nancy Mattia

Though Nancy has been writing about weddings for years, she admits that watching a bride walk down the aisle—even on TV—still makes her tear up. The New York-area writer's other favorite wedding moments are when the groom sees the bride for the first time, hearing the toasts, and when she sees a waiter with a tray full of hors d'oeuvres walking towards her. 

Comments Add a comment

Advertisement

Don't Miss…