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DIY Citrus Centerpieces That Add a Pop of Color to Your Tablescape

Creative ways to combine fruits and flowers.

Contributor
citrus centerpiece yellow lemons
Photography by: Joey Carman Photography

Courtney Sixx, Hollywood's How2Girl, is all about rethinking uses for some of her favorite "ingredients"—like lemons and limes. Sure they add just the right amount of tang to a dish or mixed drink, but left intact (or relatively so) they can also create a lively color palette or add just the perfect pop of color to any decorating detail that becomes a masterpiece. The shapes of fruits are fun to work with too—even better is that these lemons and limes, oranges and grapefruits are readily available and budget-friendly. Check out these projects for some of the juicy details.

 

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citrus centerpiece grapefruit limes leaves silver vase
Photography by: Joey Carman Photography

Fruits and Leaves

Ruby red grapefruits and limes pop perfectly from a bevy of rich green leaves. The portrait of this elegant arrangement proves there are no flowers necessary.

 

  1. Choose a tall-footed vessel. Soak two half aquafoam cylinders in cold water. Place on top of the vessel, this will be the base of the arrangement.
  2. Insert 3 to 5 large wood barbeque skewers into the top center of the foam cylinder to keep the two pieces secure. 
  3. Slice a few of the grapefruits in half.
  4. Trim the skewers to size, spear fruits through center end to end, being sure skewer tip does not protrude from end being displayed. Stick other end into floral foam ball to secure.
  5. Arrange grapefruits (cut and whole) and limes all around sphere, alternating fruits as you go.
  6. Fill in with sprigs of green leaves, poking sprig ends into sphere.
citrus centerpieces orange blossoms table numbers box
Photography by: Joey Carman Photography

Farmer's Market Table Numbers

Crates stenciled to look like they're straight from orange farms, are used to hold a display made from oranges as well as tulips and roses of the same color. Peat moss adds to the rustic display and hides any holes in the arrangement.

 

  1. Using stencils and craft paint, label each crate on one long side with California or Florida to denote origin of oranges. On one small side, paint on the table number.
  2. Fill crate with floral foam.
  3. Using wood barbeque skewers, spear oranges from end to end through center; do not let skewer poke all the way through end of orange.
  4. Arrange flowers and oranges in crate, making oranges prevalent along box edges and through center.
  5. Tuck peat moss along edge slots and through "holes" in arrangement.
citrus centerpiece roses lemon pink vase
Photography by: Joey Carman Photography

Orange Blossoms

Little bursts of small oranges—both whole and halves—brighten up a romantic bouquet of deep red and pink roses.

 

  1. Fill large glass vessel with floral foam.
  2. Arrange flowers in floral foam, filling in with greenery like eucalyptus leaves
  3. Cut a few oranges in half. Skewer oranges (halves and whole) on wood barbeque skewers trimmed to desired length.
  4. Using wide satin ribbon in a complementary color, wrap glass vessel at the bottom one time around, trim and secure with hot glue gun. Repeat wrapping, trimming, gluing and securing to cover entire vessel.

 

citrus centerpiece lemon frame
Photography by: Joey Carman Photography

Lemon Masterpiece

A gilded gold frame is the perfect border for rows of lemons festooned with green hydrangeas. This centerpiece is heavy and needs to lean somewhere so consider making it a bar display or one for place cards or other entry table that can be set against a wall or other barrier.

 

  1. Build up back of frame: Use sturdy backboard covered in light yellow satin or matte fabric. Attach to frame using heavy-duty tape, wire or a piece of word tacked to the back. Lemons are heavy and need extra strong backing.
  2. Layout lemons in linear patterns but with variety of directional placement in each.
  3. Use a generous amount of hot glue to secure each lemon, working on one row at a time.
  4. Hot glue stem sides and bottoms of hydrangea bunches (trim stems to about 1 1/2 inches) and secure to frame back and to lemon side to secure.
  5. Carefully place lemon frame on bar table with Champagne cocktail served with lemon wedges.

 

Credits

Text by Amy Nebens
Photography by Joey Carman Photography
Floral foam, crates, skewers, ribbon, frame, hot glue gun and hot glue available at Michael’s.
Fabric available at JoAnn’s.
Cake stands available at Home Goods or Bed, Bath & Beyond.
Lemons available at Costco.
 
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