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5 Winter Wedding Emergencies—Solved

Think ahead about what could go wrong and the steps to take now to prevent disaster later.

Contributing Writer
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There's a saying, "Hope for the best, prepare for the worst," and it couldn't be more applicable then when it comes to a winter wedding. You hope and pray that a blizzard won't ruin the plans that took you months to make. But severe storms happen, and you've got to deal. While you can't change the weather, you can make some smart moves ahead of time that will make all the difference if a major snowstorm strikes and leave you a lot less stressed on your wedding day. Here are some situations that could happen and how to take control of them.

 

10 Reasons Winter Weddings Are the Best

What could go wrong:

Downed power lines have left your reception venue in the dark just hours before your wedding.

Think ahead:

When you're visiting venues, ask if they have an emergency generator, so if the electricity goes off, they have a backup source.

What could go wrong:

A blizzard closes your local airport the day before the wedding, and officials don't know when it will open again.

Think ahead:

Encourage guests who are traveling from far away to plan on arriving a few days before the wedding. If flights get cancelled the day before or on your big day, you won't have to worry about no-shows because your people are already with you.

5 Wedding-Day Mishaps—and the Backup Plans to Fix Them

What could go wrong:

The shuttle you hired to take out-of-towners from their hotel to the ceremony and then the reception has canceled due to the weather. Your elderly relatives are wary of stepping out into the 40-mile-per-hour winds and taking public transportation or an Uber.

Think ahead:

Instead of expecting guests to troop from one site to another, book your wedding in a venue that can handle both a ceremony and reception. Better yet, host your wedding in a hotel, where guests can go from the ceremony to the reception to their beds without leaving the building!

What could go wrong:

You planned to take outdoor photos in a sculpture garden but it's a 30-minute drive and many icy roads away.

Think ahead:

Have a backup location that's close to your reception venue. It may not be as amazing as your original setting, but it's more thoughtful to your bridal party, who won’t feel they're risking their lives getting to your preferred spot or in danger of frostbite just to say "cheese!"

Every Wedding Checklist You'll Need

What could go wrong:

Many guests, including locals, are grumbling about traveling to your wedding in a snowstorm, and you're starting to feel guilty.

Think ahead:

No guilt necessary! An invitation isn't a command performance, so if a few people don't want to leave their house for your wedding, that's their prerogative. Be gracious to them even if you're disappointed. And show your gratitude to those who braved the freezing temps with a DIY coffee and hot chocolate station available as soon as they arrive at the reception!

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About the Author

Nancy Mattia

Though Nancy has been writing about weddings for years, she admits that watching a bride walk down the aisle—even on TV—still makes her tear up. The New York-area writer's other favorite wedding moments are when the groom sees the bride for the first time, hearing the toasts, and when she sees a waiter with a tray full of hors d'oeuvres walking towards her. 

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