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6 Hair Treatments You Definitely Want to Avoid Before the Wedding

We all want to have perfect wedding hair, but certain treatments when timed too close to the big day are very risky.

Contributing Writer
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Photography by: Michael Stewart

Obviously, you want your hair to look its very best on the big day, so you'll want to scout out the right beauty regimen. But know this: Hair treatments performed too close to the wedding date can spell disaster. We've got the scoop from trustworthy hair stylists on what hair treatments you should skip.

 

Don't use moisture masks and heavy conditioners.

While these are great about a week out, don't mask your hair the night before or even two shampoos before getting your hair done for your wedding. "Sometimes, these can leave your hair slick and heavy—not to good for event styling longevity," says Max Gierl, senior stylist at mizu New York salon. "Mask your hair regularly (follow your stylist instructions) up to two weeks before your wedding if you have thick hair and 10 days before for medium to fine hair. However, a volume treatment—like the one from Kerastase would be a fine choice a few days before. Your hairstylist will use all the best products to ensure your hair is shiny and beautiful on the day of."

 

Don't get keratin treatments.

Keratin treatments are a godsend for smoothing your hair, especially during humid seasons, and you want to do it pretty soon before your wedding to avoid those telltale roots along your hairline as it grows out. However, don't do it too close, especially if it's your first time. "I'd advise a good month before the actual wedding," says Dennis Ramirez, expert hairstylist at Brighton Salon in Beverly Hills. This is a treatment you want to settle in. If you're worried about frizz and flyaways, get a smoothing gloss before which will condition, add shine, offer a heat protectant, and most importantly, coat your cuticle with a conditioner that'll only enhance your keratin treatment.

 

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Don't see a new stylist for a haircut or color too soon before your wedding.

"I cannot stress this enough: Having a regular hairdresser that you trust is always the best way to get what you want and keep it that way," says Gierl. Especially when you've seen a hairstylist for a wedding trial and then they show up and your hair is a different color and length ... it does not bode well. As for color, it's just too risky to have someone try something new or see someone you've never seen before.

 

"Often times your colorist is adjusting your color formula a bit each time you see them to ensure perfect results. Stick with your regular! Especially before the special day. And if it's highlights for you, do them a week or so before the big day. The hair cuticle will heal itself given a little rest after the lightening process—less uncontrollable frizz," says Gierl.



Don't deviate too much from your daily routine.

For example, don't start using new styling products or break out that flat iron on your hair if you've not usually done so. You have no idea how your hair will react, or if you are even using it correctly. This would be a terrible way to find out!

 

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Don't get extensions (other than clip-ins) too close to the big day.

Everyone's hair is different—textures and thickness—and some styles won't always turn out like the photo. This is where extensions come in handy! "But if you're not used to extensions, get clip-ins!" says Melissa Porter of Melissa's Hair Beauty & Health Salon. "We recommend clip-in extensions so that you can quickly and easily remove them to avoid wedding night disasters trying to get them out! The last thing you want to do on your wedding night is painstakingly fuss with your hair to get them out."

 

Don't wash your hair the day of your updo!

(Unless given specific instructions to do so by the person actually doing your hair!) "Usually, a bit more grunge in your hair the better for longevity—especially for volume and holding teasing. Nothing worse than having your updo start to deflate after you leave the salon," says Gierl.

 

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