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How to Get In (and Out!) of a Car in a Wedding Dress

It takes some serious maneuvering.

Contributing Writer

Wearing a wedding dress is not like walking around in skinny jeans and a tee. It's likely got some serious poundage (all those beads!) and yards and yards of fabric (don't forget the train). That's why it takes a strategy to keep your gown from becoming wrinkled as you get in and out of a car. Follow our directions and your dress will look gorgeous coming and going.

How to get in a car:

Just as using the toilet while wearing a wedding dress requires two people, getting in and out of a car in a gown also requires a second pair of hands. 


First, pass your bouquet to a bridesmaid or your driver—you'll need both of your hands to hold your dress. Have your helper open the car door for you and lift your train. Standing as close to the car door as you can, lift your dress by the side seams as you turn around and back into the car—that's right, your butt gets in first. Bending from the waist, carefully lower yourself to slide onto the seat, then swing your legs inside. 


Gather your dress and gently lay it on your lap, along with the train. Your helper should make sure every inch of your dress and veil are safely inside the car. Then sit back and enjoy the ride.

How to get out of a car:

Just do everything in reverse. Kidding! After your driver parks in a clean, dry spot (no water, dirt, mud, leaves) and opens your door, hand off your bouquet again and use your hands to shimmy to the end of the seat near the door. 


Turn your body so you can swing your legs to the side and step onto the ground with both feet first. Ask the driver to take your hand so you have some support as you step out of the car and stand. Your bridesmaid or someone else who rode with you should make sure your dress, train, and veil are completely out of the car before someone closes the door. Now you're ready for the spotlight!

About the Author

Nancy Mattia

Though Nancy has been writing about weddings for years, she admits that watching a bride walk down the aisle—even on TV—still makes her tear up. The New York-area writer's other favorite wedding moments are when the groom sees the bride for the first time, hearing the toasts, and when she sees a waiter with a tray full of hors d'oeuvres walking towards her. 


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