How to Get the Most Out of Your Wedding Hair Trial

It's a mane attraction, after all.

Digital Editorial Intern

Never has there been a better reason to book a salon and go all out with pampering than your wedding day. But before the big day arrives, you'll want a trial run to confirm that your hairstyle is just the one you are after. 


"It is not only important to see what you like and don't, but it is so important to see how something holds," says Eva Scrivo, author of Eva Scrivo on Beauty: The Tools, Techniques, and Insider Knowledge Every Woman Needs To Be Her Most Beautiful, Confident Self and owner of Eva Scrivo Salon in New York City, which specializes in bridal beauty. You're figuring out how to get a look to last throughout the day and evening, and doing a trial is a great way to see if it is going to last—so here's how to make the most out of your appointment!



Prepare your hair appropriately. 

If you have oily or fine hair, wash it the morning of the trial, advises Scrivo. If your hair is thick and unruly, where bobby pins struggle to hold, or an upsweep is typically hard to maintain, rinse the night before. 


Go to the salon alone. 

Sometimes it is best to leave the peanut gallery behind. "Don't bring a friend or your mother," says Scrivo. "Other people's opinions can sway what you truly want, and the type of look you're going for." Heading to the salon without friends will help maintain the creative process between the bride and stylist, and also save time with distracting chatter and head-turns. 


Bring photographs of your dress. 

Whether your dress is strapless, low back, high neck or one-shouldered will matter. Go to the salon with photographs of the dress to help your stylist determine what sort of look will be the most flattering. 


Bring your veil, if you can. 

While many brides do not get their veil until much closer to the wedding day, Scrivo says it is important to work with the veil when deciding on a hairstyle. "The veil can sometimes look like an afterthought when it's not fully integrated into the overall shape of the hairstyle." Bringing the veil with you will help your stylist make the veil look seamless, rather than the last accessory you fastened to your head. 


Take photographs. 

You'll need to take pictures of your head from every angle–straight shot, side angle, and again from the back. This is how you will be captured on your wedding day, and if you aren't happy with one viewpoint, now is the time to make those adjustments. These pictures serve a purpose for the stylist as well. "Three to six months and a thousand clients later," says Scrivo, and it's hard to remember what the bride settled on. 


Then go to a dance class! 

"Do an activity to see how your hair holds up," says Scrivo. "Maybe salsa or Pilates. It will be a really good indication of how your hair looks by the end of the night."

About the Author

Allison Fox

Allison Fox was a terribly shy four year old flower girl at her cousin's wedding, which took place in Allison's backyard. You'd think she would feel comfortable on her own territory—but no. When it was her turn to walk down the aisle, Allison clutched the back of her older sister's dress until she reached the altar, never fulfilling her job of sprinkling petals. These days, the MSW...


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