Monogram Details

Martha Stewart Weddings, Winter 2004

Creating a new monogram is a romantic gesture: The union of a bride's and groom's initials is a metaphor for the coming together of two lives. So it's only fitting that the letters of a couple's insignia may embrace one another or stand side-by-side, or that a single letter can speak for the two.

A monogram can take many forms, so look around at all kinds of text for inspiration -- printed materials, computer fonts, even a friend's lovely handwriting. Examine calligraphy books, posters, clip-art collections, old tomes with illuminated text, embroidered linens, or antique samplers. Then take examples of your favorite letter styles to a stationer, calligrapher, or graphic designer, and have him or her help you shape them into a monogram that is all your own.

The invitation is a wonderful place to debut a new monogram. Then you can use the insignia to personalize other elements of your wedding, large and small. Think beyond the napkins and matchbooks. There are many elegant ways to bring these special letters to the walls, to the cake, and even down the aisle.

Monogram Etiquette
Invitations, programs, or anything distributed before the couple says "I do" should carry the initial of the bride's maiden name. The twenty-six letters in the alphabet can yield infinite numbers of unique monograms. Highlight one initial, or combine two, three, or four into a new logo. Letters can be regal with ornate curlicues, sleek with simple lines, or somewhere in between.

Beaded Bouquet
Geometric Cake
Floral Wreath
Chic Pearls
Silk Flowers
Candy Favors
Romantic Parasol

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