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Fabric Leaf Boutonniere

Give your groom and groomsmen a boutonniere they can keep. Create these fabric leaf boutonnieres for a fall wedding or anytime of year.
Martha Stewart Weddings
  1. Select a lightweight or medium-weight suiting fabric with a prominent grain or stripe. Cut a half-leaf shape from fabric positioned on the bias.
  2. Flip the cut-out shape over, and lay it on the fabric so stripes align exactly (they'll create the effect of veins when the leaf is opened); cut around it.
  3. Machine-sew the two leaf halves together along the straight edge, as close to the edge as possible. (For leaves made of non-striped fabric, such as felt, cut a full leaf shape, fold in half vertically, and iron a crease.) Next, slip a length of cloth-covered floral wire between the two layers, extending partway up the leaf, and whip-stitch it into place. (We used contrasting thread for display purposes; you should use a thread that matches.)
  4. Open up the leaf, then press with an iron. Wrap wire with brown floral tape. Lay the fresh sprig on top of the leaf, and wrap its stem to the floral-wire stem with narrow ribbon.

Comments (3)

  • Sanja Hunt 10 Sep, 2012

    This is really a great idea. I love to make unusual "flowers to wear".
    You can also use a very textured paper or paper with many threads in it. After cutting the leaf shape of your choice apply fabric stiffener and let it dry. They cut a length of copper wire for the center vein of the leaf and glue it to the leaf shape. You can then apply herbs, flowers grasses or other material to the leaf.
    I think the fabric stiffener will prevent fraying on cloth as well. Silk leaves would work the same.

  • Sanja Hunt 10 Sep, 2012

    This is really a great idea. I love to make unusual "flowers to wear".
    You can also use a very textured paper or paper with many threads in it. After cutting the leaf shape of your choice apply fabric stiffener and let it dry. They cut a length of copper wire for the center vein of the leaf and glue it to the leaf shape. You can then apply herbs, flowers grasses or other material to the leaf.
    I think the fabric stiffener will prevent fraying on cloth as well. Silk leaves would work the same.

  • Aimzcodz 5 Dec, 2011

    I am making these lovely boutonnierres out of men's ties. Has anyone made these? My query is about how to stop the cut edges fraying? Did you overlook yours? Or did you use a fabric that didn't fray? Kathy S, New Zealand